Design Docs: IC Tooltips

I recently posted a challenge to game designers to share more of their documentation, so academia had more examples to learn from. And then I posted an Outline of Game Documentation, with some high level descriptions of different types of game design documents. Time for me to share some!

From 2012-2014 I worked on a DC Comics MOBA called Infinite Crisis. I was one of the Champion Designers: our team was responsible for designing the character abilities and overall balance. I ended up as the tooltip guru: I cared a lot about their conventions and the way we used language and keywords. I have a small collection of documents related to this work!

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Design Docs: IC Character Specs

I recently posted a challenge to game designers to share more of their documentation, so academia had more examples to learn from. And then I posted an Outline of Game Documentation, with some high level descriptions of different types of game design documents. Time for me to share some!

From 2012-2014 I worked on a DC Comics MOBA called Infinite Crisis. I was one of the Champion Designers: our team was responsible for designing the character abilities and overall balance. Generally, a given character would be owned by a single designer from start to finish, and over months of design iteration (which I’ll cover in another post), we’d eventually reach a state where we were confident in the design we were going to make. At that point the designer would write their first draft of the complete “Character Spec” document.

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Common Game Design Documents

In a recent twitter thread, I posted a general challenge to professional game designers to share more of their game design documentation. The goal: give academia more examples to learn from. I’d better put my money where my mouth is!

But first, I wanted to share some general thoughts about project documentation, and examples of common documentation archetypes.

The Monolithic Game Design Document (GDD)

When I was in school my professors spent a lot of time teaching how to write formal game design documents (GDDs), stressing their importance. These were single monolithic documents that supposedly captured every detail of a game’s design. In theory the entire team would read the GDD, refer to it often, and trust it to have any answer they might need. They would set and communicate both creative and art direction!

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