Category Archives: Game Industry

Lay Off Post-Mortem

This is the story of my first lay off, what I learned from it, and how I recovered. I recently received a job offer; this story now has an ending, so the time has come to tell it!

Exeunt Max

In the summer of 2014 we were deeply entrenched in a new F2P service game that had gone into open beta a few months prior. The game was in a precarious position, a topic that our project leadership was very open with us about. We resolved to turn it around that summer, and set some very ambitious goals. And we succeeded! We built an excellent game: tightly balanced, responsive, polished, and great looking.

In the middle of this process, we learned that there were going to be some publisher-wide layoffs hitting our parent company and its devs at about the same time we were wrapping up this summer push. We knew layoffs were coming, and we knew that our project was at risk. We even knew the date that they were going to happen. The team handled it well, and we still built a great game: we were proud of it and wanted it to succeed, with or without us. But the weeks leading up to the layoffs were still tense with worry: we didn’t know who or how many were on the chopping block. Read More →

In Defense of DLC

Preface (5/12/2015): A few weeks ago Polygon posted a news article revealing the Arkham Knight DLC and pricing. The news post was very aggressive and judgmental of the model, and the tone of the comments was mostly angry. It was very clear that the core gamer crowd reading that article did not understand how DLC was made, or why it could be good for them. Later that day I wrote an article that I pitched to Polygon, with the goal of educating their readers a little bit. I haven’t heard back from them, so posting it here! My summary of it is really simplistic compared to the real deal, but it was as detailed as I wanted for the audience.

Hey Polygon readers! Recently Rocksteady announced a $40 season pass for Arkham Knight, and there was some lively discussion in the comments. I saw two themes: some people were angry because they thought that this DLC could have been ready at launch, and was being withheld from gamers out of greed. Others complained about the general trend of having to buy DLC to enjoy the “complete experience”.

I think that all of this anger is misplaced. So let’s talk about DLC, and why, done right, it is a great thing for gamers and game developers.

Read More →

NPR All Things Considered: Grokking and Greebling

NPR’s All Things Considered radio show was doing a series of short stories covering trade lingo in different industries. I submitted a list of game development terms, and they brought me in to do an interview at the studio. It lasted 10 or 15 minutes, and was then edited down to a 3 minute segment that they aired shortly after. I primarily talked about the word “grok”, but I also touched on the word “greebling”. You can read the transcript and listen to the original NPR story here.

It turns out that greebling isn’t really a game industry term; it comes from the film industry, and I just happened to pick it up at college around a bunch of game artists. So, uh, you win some you lose some!

Update (7/24/2018):

You can listen to the interview here:

 

Zelda Sales Numbers in Context 2014

Preface (3/23/2015): I did the original research for this because I wanted to win an argument on the internet. I was fascinated enough by what I learned that I did it again, with more in-depth and better researched data, and published it a year or so ago on my small Zelda website, Zeldadata.com. It was definitely intended for a Zelda-fan audience.

Zelda sales numbers seem straight-forward: They’re simple data about how much each game has sold. They’re easy to understand, and they’re easy to reference when you need to prove a point. But the attention generally stops there, when there is in fact much to be learned from sales data! Let us begin with the most important list: the sales data for each Zelda game, ranked:

fig1_sales

 

So now we know how much each Zelda title has sold. There’s some interesting data there. It’s tempting to use this data, exactly as it is, to draw conclusions about things like popularity and impact on games. Ocarina of Time is clearly the most popular Zelda game on this list. And A Link to the Past must have had a bigger impact on gaming than The Legend of Zelda, since it sold so much more. Right? Read More →