Zelda Fan Survey 2014

Preface (3/23/2015): This survey was originally published almost a year ago, at my small Zelda site, Zeldadata.com. The audience was Zelda fans, not game devs! I’m re-publishing it here mostly as an exercise to put my blog workflow through it’s paces, but also because I think it’s awesome.

I have spent years pondering and talking about what makes the Zelda games tick: why do so many people, including myself, hold them in such high regard? What is this “Zelda magic” that everyone speaks of, and what do they mean when they say it? So I decided to ask! I built a survey intended to give me a glimpse into the minds and tastes of Zelda fans, and distributed it within the online Zelda fan community. I got nearly 6000 responses, an outstanding show of interest from my fellow fans, and learned a number of interesting things.

The Sample

The first step is to put these answers in context: Who are the people that answered the survey? What group are they actually representative of?

The survey was advertised in several places, and got 5,890 responses:

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Zelda Sales Numbers in Context 2014

Preface (3/23/2015): I did the original research for this because I wanted to win an argument on the internet. I was fascinated enough by what I learned that I did it again, with more in-depth and better researched data, and published it a year or so ago on my small Zelda website, Zeldadata.com. It was definitely intended for a Zelda-fan audience.

Zelda sales numbers seem straight-forward: They’re simple data about how much each game has sold. They’re easy to understand, and they’re easy to reference when you need to prove a point. But the attention generally stops there, when there is in fact much to be learned from sales data! Let us begin with the most important list: the sales data for each Zelda game, ranked:

fig1_sales

 

So now we know how much each Zelda title has sold. There’s some interesting data there. It’s tempting to use this data, exactly as it is, to draw conclusions about things like popularity and impact on games. Ocarina of Time is clearly the most popular Zelda game on this list. And A Link to the Past must have had a bigger impact on gaming than The Legend of Zelda, since it sold so much more. Right? Read More →

High Granularity Vs Low Granularity Space

Preface (3/23/2015): I originally wrote this article three years ago, when I was just beginning my design career. It was half proposal, half exploration of design concept. I’ve cut a few parts out that aren’t really relevant to my readers; if it seems to start and end abruptly, that’s why. I had not yet worked on a MOBA, where I learned quite a bit about tanking in PVP, and I overlooked many examples of high-granularity 3D games that had readable positional and facing gameplay. Nevertheless, I think the basic gist of this article is still quite accurate: there is an inverse relationship between spatial granularity and tactical readability.

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about the game industry’s embrace of fully 3D spaces, huge numbers of possible viewing angles, and the incredible amount of fine granularity introduced when you can move or look anywhere. I’ve come to some interesting conclusions about the effect this all has on gameplay. I want to throw a wrench in the tanking paradigm; bring a focus onto positioning, level design, and the environment; and improve the tactical readability of combat. Read More →

Zelda 25th Anniversary: 2001

Preface (3/23/2015): I used to be a prolific writer at Zelda Universe, a large Zelda fansite, during my teenage years. When the 25th anniversary of the Zelda franchise loomed, they decided they wanted to run a series of 25 articles, celebrating each year. They contacted me and asked me to do one; I volunteered for 2001, and wrote the article below. My audience was primarily teenage Zelda fans, so I wrote for them.

Ah, 2001. It was a tumultuous year, and a watershed moment for the Zelda franchise and the game industry. It saw the release of not one, but two Zelda games – two Zelda games developed by Capcom, with Nintendo’s blessing.  It was a year that polarized and divided the Zelda fanbase more than any other, when the first footage of The Wind Waker surfaced at the final Spaceworld. We saw the launch of the Gameboy Advance, the Gamecube, and Super Smash Bros Melee. And, in the industry at large, Sega announced that it was going 3rd party, the Playstation 2 was in full stride, and Microsoft jumped in with the release of the Xbox and Halo. For me, a thirteen year old Zelda fanboy, the stakes were high and the drama was irresistible.

I was as happy as a clam, impatient, angry at various people on the internet (of course!), and ridiculously excited for all the ups and downs that my favorite gaming franchise had in store for me. I think I speak for all of the Zelda fandom when I say that 2001 was – wait for it! – legendary. Not convinced? We’ll see about that.

Your typical Zelda fan, in January 2001, had two things on his or her mind: the impending release of the Oracles and the Spaceworld 2000 tech demo footage that blew us all away with its hyper-realistic depiction of Link fighting Ganondorf.  We had been teased – marketed at with great success. We had tasted paradise, and it was the Gamecube’s power to render Ganondorf’s five fully-articulated fingers while he taunted us from across the sea, at Japanese trade shows. We wanted more – we were hungry for more of that juicy goodness, and it would take something hefty to sate us. Read More →

Achievement Design Guidelines

Preface (3/24/2015): In 2011 I was tasked with designing an achievement system for one of the games I was working on. That system never saw the light of day, but I did write some guidelines on achievement design, intended to help future designers that might work on the system. This is an excerpt from those guidelines. Many of these were derived from reading achievement guides written by other designers – but because I never expected to publish this, I didn’t do a good job of saving links to those guides. If you have written similar guides on your own blog, please link to them in the comments here!

While researching achievement systems, I came up with a number of guidelines we should attempt to follow while designing achievements. An important thing to understand is that achievement systems can be used to incentivize a very wide variety of player behaviors, to the point that players will do things they do not enjoy just to earn an achievement.

Push players towards enjoyment

If there is a type of play-style or mechanic that players enjoy already, it’s a good candidate for achievements. Think carefully before incentivizing something they do NOT enjoy.

Evaluate an achievement by the most efficient method it could be earned

Ask yourself: if I was a dedicated player out to earn this achievement as fast as possible, how would I do it? Make sure the answer is something we’re willing to live with. Read More →

Controlling a MOBA on a console controller

Preface (3/24/2015): I wrote this four years ago, when I was still working in QA. I had never worked on a MOBA , or played one on a console. Or done any sort of in-depth dive into polishing a control scheme, for that matter. But I was real proud of this write-up at the time!

This is a concept document examining the design challenges of creating League of Legends or a clone of League of Legends on a console.

Control Scheme Goals:

Speed

Players must be able to execute actions quickly. They must not feel delayed by menus, slow targeting methods, or any other aspect of the interface.

Precision

Players must be able to execute actions with precision. If it involves aiming, the control scheme should allow players to aim at exactly the point they want to aim at. There should never be any ambiguity, and, if the player misses or otherwise fails to perform the action, it should be because of player error, not a failure of interface or controls. Read More →